Timeline: A Garden a Hundred Years in the Making

Started a century ago as place for scientists to breed cultivars and farmers to learn how to expand their growing options to ornamental plants, Rutgers Gardens has become a beloved public space that welcomes visitors all year round.

  • Rutgers Garden
    The Donald B. Lacey Display Garden in Autumn

    1870s: George H. Cook purchases a 1,000-acre farm. The five acres along Ryders Lane (where the office, formerly Reynolds House, is located) is the only vestige of the Gardens that belonged to the original Cook Farm.

    1916: Additional land, known as Wolpert Farm, is purchased from Jacob and Celia Lipman on May 17. Today, this land defines the heart of the Gardens.

    From the mid-1800s, New Jersey experiences a housing boom and ornamental horticulture becomes a trend. To meet the new demand for shrubs and trees, Rutgers develops the Gardens as a space for local farmers to learn about the new plant-nursery industry.

  • 1922 photo of the Iris Display Garden
    The Iris Display Garden in 1939

    1922: The first garden, the Iris Display Garden, is planted.

    Historically, Rutgers Gardens is composed of a series of horticultural collections arranged in garden settings and spread over 50 acres. The collections are located just east of U.S. Route 1 on Ryders Lane in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Rutgers Gardens covers 180 acres.

  • The log cabin in the Rutgers Garden
    The Log Cabin

    1935: Plans begin for the log cabin, constructed as part of a W.P.A. project. The first event is held there a year later.

    1937: A portion of Helyar Woods is bequeathed to Rutgers.

    1939–1941: The Shrub Garden, Rhododendron Garden, Lilac Walk, and Holly Orchard are established.

    With the opening of the log cabin in 1936, the Gardens begins to open up to the public. Rutgers horticulture collections and garden areas feature a diverse variety of landscape plants with origins that span the globe. The holly collection is particularly renowned.

  • Evergreen Garden
    The Roy DeBoer Evergreen Garden

    1958–1959: The Evergreen Garden, Shade Tree Collection, and Small Tree Collection are planted.

    Roy DeBoer, a chair of the Landscape Architecture Department, designs the Evergreen Garden, grouping plants by genus around a great sunken lawn.

  • Lacey Display Garden
    The Donald B. Lacey Display Garden

    1965: First Open House.

    1970: Reynolds House (present-day office) and Thomson House are built.

    In 1964, Donald B. Lacey, a Rutgers Cooperative Extension specialist in home horticulture, creates a display garden to feature combinations of outstanding and exceptional annuals for summer-long color and interest. In 1965, Lacey establishes the Rutgers Gardens Open House to showcase the garden.

    Currently, the yearly July open house features entertaining and informational tours of Rutgers Gardens, as well as "Ask The Expert" tables staffed by Rutgers Cooperative Extension agents, program associates, and Master Gardeners from throughout the state.

  • Bruce Hamilton, acting director
    Bruce Hamilton at work in the Gardens in the early 2000s

    1990: Dr. Bruce Hamilton becomes acting director, and initiates volunteer upkeep program.

    1993: Cook College alumni provide funding to build the Alumni Pavilion.

    1994: First Spring Flower Fair.

    1996: Internship program is established.

    The Gardens as we know them blooms around 1990, when Bruce Hamilton, a landscape architecture professor, becomes acting director and starts a strong volunteer program and community component.

  • Helyar woods
    Helyar Woods

    2005: School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Dean Bob Goodman declares Helyar Woods a part of Rutgers Gardens.

    2006: Garden Series Classes begin.

    Part of the Gardens' mission is to promote and provide accurate information about the art of horticulture with an emphasis upon the relationship between plants, human health, and nutrition in both the designed and natural landscapes.

  • Gala
    The Gardens Gala in 2010

    2007: The first Gardens Gala, now called the Gardens Party.

    In what has become a "true foodie event," the September party features local produce from Jersey Fresh farm market vendors. Proceeds from the Gardens Party support the Gardens and the development of a proposed Visitors Center.

  • A stand at the farmer’s market
    The Farmers Market

    2008: First Farmers Market.

    2011: First week-long children’s summer camp.

    The Friday Farmers Market gives the Rutgers community and the public easy access to fresh, locally grown crops and commodities such as meat, cheeses, vegetables, poultry, and baked goods. The market supports farmers, as well as the local community and economy, with a focus upon recycling and conservation.

    The camp is a fun outdoor program that offers children activities that take advantage of the expertise and the many facilities throughout Rutgers Gardens, including vegetable and flower gardens, a bamboo grove, streams and ponds, hiking trails, and rolling lawns.

  • advisory board
    The Gardens Advisory Board at the 100-year celebration

    2016: Centennial Year!

    Rutgers Gardens is a self-sustaining operation. During our Centennial Celebration, please consider joining us and helping us reach our goal of 1000 members during our centennial year.

  • Rutgers Garden
    1/10
  • 1922 photo of the Iris Display Garden
    2/10
  • The log cabin in the Rutgers Garden
    3/10
  • Evergreen Garden
    4/10
  • Lacey Display Garden
    5/10
  • Bruce Hamilton, acting director
    6/10
  • Helyar woods
    7/10
  • Gala
    8/10
  • A stand at the farmer’s market
    9/10
  • advisory board
    10/10
  • Wireless
    Comfort and Convenience
    Wireless

    Settle in, open your laptop, and get to work. Wireless internet access is available at the Alexander, Art, Chang, Douglass, James Dickson Carr, Math, Robert Wood Johnson Health Sciences, Science and Medicine libraries.

  • Self-checkout
    Comfort and Convenience
    Self-Checkout at Alexander Library

    Located in front of the circulation desk, the Alexander Library self-checkout station allows borrowers to check out their own books quickly and easily using step-by-step instructions displayed on a touch screen.

  • Quiet room
    Comfort and Convenience
    Quiet Reading Rooms

    When you need time for quiet, independent study, you’ll find pleasant reading rooms with comfortable furniture in all the main libraries.

  • Multimedia
    Comfort and Convenience
    Multimedia Equipment and Instruction

    The Sharon A. Fordham Multimedia Resource Lab at the Douglass Library lets you create multimedia projects using Final Cut Pro, Photoshop, GarageBand, iMovie, iPhoto, and much more. Workshops teach you how to use the multimedia resources and how to conduct interviews for your media projects.

  • Scanning
    Comfort and Convenience
    Self-Scanning

    It’s eco-friendly (less paper), it’s easy, and for Rutgers affiliates, it’s free. Public scanning stations at Alexander Library, the Art Library, Dana Library, James Dickson Carr Library, Library of Science and Medicine, and the Robeson Library feature the ability to send scanned files to email or USB drives and scanning in black and white or color.

  • Group study
    Comfort and Convenience
    Group Study Rooms

    Your professors are increasingly assigning work requiring group collaboration and study. Most group study rooms in the libraries are available on a first-come, first-served basis; many are equipped for wireless internet access.

  • Librarians
    Comfort and Convenience
    Experienced Librarians Ready to Help

    At Information Services stations, you will find experienced librarians who can assist you with challenging research projects, whether you’re seeking a hard-to-locate monograph or tracking down a scholarly journal. You can also tap into the librarians' know-how remotely—by phone, via email, and even through instant messaging.

  • Students conducting research at Special Collections and University Archives
    Comfort and Convenience
    Special Collections and University Archives

    Special Collections and University Archives is the chief repository of rare books and materials. These serve as primary sources for those engaged in advanced study and research in the humanities and social sciences. 

  • Wireless
    1/8
  • Self-checkout
    2/8
  • Quiet room
    3/8
  • Multimedia
    4/8
  • Scanning
    5/8
  • Group study
    6/8
  • Librarians
    7/8
  • Students conducting research at Special Collections and University Archives
    8/8

Celebrating the Inaugural Big Ten Season  

Road tours, get-togethers, and great game moments mark Rutgers' first year in the Big Ten Conference.

  • Mascots and cheerleaders from Big Ten schools across the country helped the Scarlet Knight celebrate Rutgers’ entry into the Big Ten.
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Big Ten mascots and cheerleaders

    Mascots and cheerleaders from Big Ten schools across the country helped the Scarlet Knight celebrate Rutgers’ entry into the Big Ten.

  • BIG tent at Rutgers Day
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    BIg Ten tent at Rutgers Day

    Be sure to visit the Big Ten display tent at Rutgers Day, April 25, to learn more about the academic and athletic benefits of Big Ten membership.

  • Women's lacrosse
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Women's lacrosse excitement

    The Scarlet Knights celebrate a goal vs. Villanova.

  • Men's baseball
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Ready for a B1G season

    New balls for Rutgers baseball this season, the team's first in the Big Ten.

  • Men's baseball
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Great hit

    Senior Vinny Zarrillo rounds the bases after a home run against Ohio State.

  • Women's softball
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Softball wins

    The Scarlet Knights get pumped up for the inaugural home Big Ten matchup vs. Michigan State. The Scarlet Knights swept the series.

  • Women's tennis
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Love it!

    Junior Mariam Zein prepares a serve in Big Ten action vs. Minnesota.

  • Men’s basketball vs. Penn State
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Men's basketball vs. Penn State

    The men's basketball team huddled up during their inaugural Big Ten victory over Penn State.

  • Men’s basketball vs. Wisconsin
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Men's basketball vs. Wisconsin

    After the men’s basketball team notched a big upset victory over #4 Wisconsin, the RAC crowd stormed the court.

  • Women’s basketball vs. Iowa
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Women's basketball vs. Iowa

    Junior Kahleah Copper scored her game-high 22 points in Rutgers women's basketball's inaugural Big Ten match up with Iowa.

  • Wrestling vs. Iowa
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Wrestling vs. Iowa

    Redshirt freshman wrestler Anthony Ashnault en route to his first Big Ten match victory. 

  • Football vs. Michigan
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Football vs. Michigan

    Redshirt freshman defensive end Kemoko Turay blocked a potential go-ahead 56-yard field goal attempt by Michigan in the fourth quarter to seal the Rutgers football team’s first Big Ten victory.

  • Women’s Volleyball vs. Purdue
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Women's volleyball vs. Purdue

    The Rutgers women's volleyball team came together before the start of its first Big Ten home opener against Purdue.

     

  • Field Hockey vs. Iowa
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Field hockey vs. Iowa

    Sophomore midfielder Alyssa Bull faced off against an Iowa player during the Scarlet Knights’ Big Ten home opener. 

  • Men’s soccer vs. Michigan
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    David Greczek led the Big Ten in saves

    Sophomore goalkeeper David Greczek leads the Big Ten in saves and ranks seventh all-time at Rutgers.

  • Women’s Soccer vs. Michigan State
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Women's soccer vs. Michigan State

    The Rutgers women’s soccer team celebrated its go-ahead goal against Michigan State, the program’s first Big Ten victory.

  • Women’s Volleyball vs. Purdue
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Women's volleyball vs. Purdue

    Junior outside hitter Alex Lassa knocked down a kill against Purdue in the team's Big Ten home opener.

  • Women’s Soccer vs. Northwestern
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Women's soccer vs. Northwestern

    Sophomore forward Madison Tiernan competed for the ball in the Rutgers women’s soccer team’s home conference match against Northwestern. 

  • B&N B1G display
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Big Ten merchandise

    Special edition Big Ten merchandise is on display and available for purchase at the Rutgers Barnes & Noble bookstore.

  • RUTGERS is BIG Times Square billboard
    Big Time Academics. Big Ten Athletics.
    Big Ten Rutgers billboard in Times Square

    A Times Square billboard helps mark Rutgers’ entry into the Big Ten.

  • Mascots and cheerleaders from Big Ten schools across the country helped the Scarlet Knight celebrate Rutgers’ entry into the Big Ten.
    1/20
  • BIG tent at Rutgers Day
    2/20
  • Women's lacrosse
    3/20
  • Men's baseball
    4/20
  • Men's baseball
    5/20
  • Women's softball
    6/20
  • Women's tennis
    7/20
  • Men’s basketball vs. Penn State
    8/20
  • Men’s basketball vs. Wisconsin
    9/20
  • Women’s basketball vs. Iowa
    10/20
  • Wrestling vs. Iowa
    11/20
  • Football vs. Michigan
    12/20
  • Women’s Volleyball vs. Purdue
    13/20
  • Field Hockey vs. Iowa
    14/20
  • Men’s soccer vs. Michigan
    15/20
  • Women’s Soccer vs. Michigan State
    16/20
  • Women’s Volleyball vs. Purdue
    17/20
  • Women’s Soccer vs. Northwestern
    18/20
  • B&N B1G display
    19/20
  • RUTGERS is BIG Times Square billboard
    20/20

Health Sciences Research in Action

From understanding the role of infinitesimal biologic structures in disease to caring for patients with today’s most forward-thinking treatments at Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Rutgers research has impact. Take a look at some standout examples below.

  • Basic molecule
    1/8
  • Polymer replacements for human tissue
    2/8
  • Zebrafish and cancer research
    3/8
  • Police Car covered in dust at Ground Zero
    4/8
  • Human Heart and Circulatory System
    5/8
  • Exserohilum rostratum fungus
    6/8
  •  Center for State Health Policy screen grab
    7/8
  • Magnified view of the Hepatitis C virus
    8/8

Idea Engines

Rutgers centers and institutes are where great minds come together to solve problems and delve into new ideas. 

  • Dr. Wise Young with his students
    Collaborative Spinal Cord Research

    It’s where global research collaboration on spinal cord injuries was pioneered. The W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience is led by Wise Young, a world leader in neuroscience and the researcher behind the China SCINet spinal cord treatment clinical trials featured in Nature.

  • Students in front of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences
    Institute of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science

    This environmental research institute is devoted to protecting marine and coastal resources and offering a variety of seminars, internships, and other opportunities for Rutgers students, including work at the Rutgers University Coastal Ocean Observation Lab, or RUCOOL.

  • Screengrab of the National Institute for Early Education Research
    National Institute for Early Education Research

    The institute conducts research to support early childhood education, offering independent advice and technical assistance to policymakers, journalists, researchers, and educators. It issues an authoritative annual review of state preschool programs, the State Preschool Yearbook.

  • Research in infrastructure and transportation systems
    Center for Advanced Infrastructure and Transportation

    CAIT is at the forefront of research in infrastructure and transportation systems, addressing the safety, security, and environmental impacts of roadways and bridges.

  • Exterior of the Waksman Institute
    Waksman Institute of Microbiology

    At the Waksman Institute of Microbiology, leading researchers focus on areas such as microbial molecular genetics, developmental molecular genetics, and structural and computational biology, with a variety of fellowships and research opportunities available to students.

  • Eagleton Institute of Politics exterior
    Eagleton Institute of Politics

    Eagleton is a leading source of scholarly research and data about politics and government, with fellowships and research opportunities available for Rutgers undergraduates and graduate students. Eagleton is also home to the Center for American Women and Politics and the Center for Public Interest Polling.

  • Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center exterior
    Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center

    A variety of opportunities for students to conduct research and fieldwork are offered by the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, which provides programs to meet the needs of people with autism spectrum disorders and their families. The center’s school program employs applied behavior analysis, an intensive form of treatment, to help those with autism respond to others and make their way in the world.

  • Center for Advanced Food Technology building
    Food Innovation Center

    A global leader in food science, the Food Innovation Center (FIC) aims to improve the safety and quality of the food supply. FIC scientists work in partnership with industry and government to conduct research and engage in product and process development for major food companies, small entrepreneurs, and other clients.

  • Four images showing global research and development
    Global Institute for BioExploration

    The Global Institute for BioExploration (GIBEX) is a global research and development network that promotes ethical, natural product-based pharmacological bioexploration to benefit human health and the environment in developing countries.

  • Three people standing in the Oral History Archives
    Rutgers Oral History Archives

    The Rutgers Oral History Archives records the personal narratives of New Jersey men and women who served during the nation's conflicts, as well as people with a story to tell about some aspect of New Jersey's proud history or the history of Rutgers University.

  • Dr. Wise Young with his students
    1/10
  • Students in front of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences
    2/10
  • Screengrab of the National Institute for Early Education Research
    3/10
  • Research in infrastructure and transportation systems
    4/10
  • Exterior of the Waksman Institute
    5/10
  • Eagleton Institute of Politics exterior
    6/10
  • Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center exterior
    7/10
  • Center for Advanced Food Technology building
    8/10
  • Four images showing global research and development
    9/10
  • Three people standing in the Oral History Archives
    10/10
  • Busch Campus Map
    Busch Campus
    Take It All In

    Open spaces and high-tech places are at Busch Campus. Medicine, science, math, engineering, pharmacy, and psychology are here. So, too, are great sports and recreation facilities. Find the engineering quad, the Visitor Center, HighPoint.com Stadium, and other hot spots on the detailed map of Busch Campus.

  • Rutgers Football Stadium
    Busch Campus
    Why Is It Called Busch Campus?

    In the 1930s, it was the River Road Campus, home to the original Rutgers Stadium. After World War II, it became University Heights. But in 1971, when mysterious financier Charles L. Busch died and unexpectedly left Rutgers $10 million for biological research, the campus was renamed in his honor.

  • Visitor Center exterior
    Busch Campus
    Start Your Tour at the Visitor Center

    Our Visitor Center, with ample parking, is the starting point for tours of Rutgers University–New Brunswick. It’s also a great place to learn about the university’s history and the contributions Rutgers’ faculty, students, and alumni have made to New Jersey, the United States, and the world.

  • Students at the Busch Campus Center
    Busch Campus
    It's All Happening at the Busch Student Center

    Food, friends, fun. Performances, conferences, exhibits, workshops. Quiet study in a cozy corner. Big laughs at Open Mic Night. The Busch Student Center is the central hub of the campus on the hill.

  • Exterior of the Waksman Institute
    Busch Campus
    Waksman Institute of Microbiology

    The gracious Georgian Colonial-style building overlooking the Rutgers University Golf Course is home to the world-renowned Waksman Institute of Microbiology.

  • Rutgers Formula Racing car
    Busch Campus
    Formula One Racing

    Engineers, marketing majors, racing fans: they all come together as the Rutgers Formula Racing Team and build a new formula race car from scratch every year. In September, team members begin their designs. In May, Rutgers–New Brunswick competes against more than 100 colleges around the globe.

  • Sonny Werblin Recreation Center building
    Busch Campus
    Sonny Werblin Recreation Center

    Awesome alumnus Sonny Werblin, RC ’31—a one-time owner of the New York Jets and former CEO of the Madison Square Garden Corp.—is honored in the recreation center that bears his name. The Werblin Center has everything from racquetball courts and an Olympic-size swimming pool to fitness rooms and dance studios.

  • Students in Genetics research lab
    Busch Campus
    Science Central

    Dozens of academic departments and research centers are located at Busch Campus, with most focusing on biological and physical sciences, mathematics, engineering, technology, pharmacy, and psychology.

  • Busch Engineering Science and Technology Residence Hall exterior
    Busch Campus
    Living on Campus

    In the 19 residence halls on Busch Campus, more than 4,600 students find a place to call home. A variety of options is available, from apartments and suites to special communities, such as BEST (Busch Engineering, Science, and Technology) Hall, that focus on a common area of interest.

  • Life Sciences Floor
    Busch Campus
    A Floor to Explore

    Depicting microscopic to macroscopic life forms, 360 bronze sculptures are embedded in the floor of the Life Sciences Building atrium, the work of sculptor Michele Oka Doner.

  • High Point Solutions Stadium
    Busch Campus
    RU Rah Rah!

    With Rutgers' entrance in the Big Ten athletic conference, the stakes and the excitement are even higher at HighPoint.com Stadium. We salute our new rivals and welcome the 52,000-plus students, alumni and general fans who come to cheer at Scarlet Knights football games.

  •  Neurosciences professor works with graduate student
    Busch Campus
    Health Sciences at Piscataway

    Key Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences units have a home on the Busch Campus. Researchers, educators, and care givers work together to develop discoveries made in laboratories into treatments that benefit people's health.

  • Busch Campus Map
    1/12
  • Rutgers Football Stadium
    2/12
  • Visitor Center exterior
    3/12
  • Students at the Busch Campus Center
    4/12
  • Exterior of the Waksman Institute
    5/12
  • Rutgers Formula Racing car
    6/12
  • Sonny Werblin Recreation Center building
    7/12
  • Students in Genetics research lab
    8/12
  • Busch Engineering Science and Technology Residence Hall exterior
    9/12
  • Life Sciences Floor
    10/12
  • High Point Solutions Stadium
    11/12
  •  Neurosciences professor works with graduate student
    12/12
  • Chichen Itza Blue
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Chichen Itza Blue (1986), Igael Tumarkin

    Donated by Philip and Muriel Berman, Chichen Itza Blue stands in front of the Buell Apartments. It was recently restored to its original brilliant blue color. The artist, Igael Tumarkin, is famous for incorporating symbols of Holocaust remembrance, in this case train tracks, in his sculpture.

    Photo: Zainab Miller

    Busch Campus

  • Reflections
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Reflections (1982), Reuben Karol

    Tucked into a corner of the Engineering Quad is a contemplative figure seated on a stack of books. Entitled Reflections, this original take on the classic thinker pose was created by Reuben Karol as a gift from the Engineering Class of 1982.

    Photo: Zainab Miller

    Busch Campus

  • Split and Twisted
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Split and Twisted (1980), Paul Sisko

    Philip and Muriel Berman donated Paul Sisko’s Split and Twisted to Rutgers in 1980. The powerful breakage of steel exaggerated by intense red color draws the attention of pedestrians. The sculpture was installed in 1981.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Busch Campus

  • Signal
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Signal (2009), Ralph Helmick

    Signal, an abstract human figure in motion, reflects the discipline of the Biomedical Engineering Building in front of which it sits. The motion of the anthropomorphic figure is dependent upon the viewer’s perspective of the sculpture although the work itself remains stationary.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Busch Campus

  • Life Forms
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Life Forms (2005), Michele Oka Doner

    In the atrium of the Life Sciences Building, the terrazzo floor comes to life with artist Michele Oka Doner’s embedded images of organisms glistening under the sunlight. 

    Photo: Don Hamerman

    Busch Campus

  • Untitled and Untitled
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Untitled and Untitled (1993), Patrick Strzelec

    These two works by Patrick Strzelec are well known by students who frequent Busch Campus bus routes. Less known to passersby is that two people speaking into either end of the piece shown at left, on the Psychology Building’s southern end, can hear each other through the sculpture.

    Photos: Nick Romanenko

    Busch Campus

  • Quaternion I and II
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Quaternion I and II (1992), Livio Saganic

    Quaternion I, left, and Quaternion II are sister sculptures flanking the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. Livio Saganic designed the abstract works around the word quaternion—referring to four dimensions—for unknown reasons.

    Photos: Quaternion I, Zainab Miller; Quaternion II, Lawrence Porter

    Busch Campus

  • Synergy
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Synergy (2013), Julian Voss-Andreae

    Synergy stands outside the Center for Integrative Proteomics Research as a towering collegen molecule, the human body's most abundant protein. Julian Voss-Andreae, whose work is influenced by his background in quantum physics, designed three entwined protein strands to reflect the center's interdisciplinary research.

    Photos: Nick Romanenko

    Busch Campus

  • Hippocrates Sculpture, Busch Campus
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Hippocrates (1973), Costos Georgakas

    This six-foot tall statue of Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, stands at the entrance to the Daniel I. Kessler Teaching Laboratories of Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Artist Costos Georgakas created five similar statues and donated them to universities across the country. At the base of the statue is a plaque with the Hippocratic Oath, the reciting of which is a rite of passage for practitioners of medicine in some countries.

    Photo: Jacob Paul

    Busch Campus

  • Barcelona bell, Busch Campus
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Barcelona (2002), Toshiko Takaezu

    Near the main entrance to Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Barcelona consists of a bronze bell suspended from a wooden framework, modeled on a traditional Japanese temple gateway. Artist Toshiko Takaezu said the name was inspired by her travels in Spain, when she could hear the mellow sounds of a church bell from her hotel, reminding her of her unfinished work back home.

    Photo: Jacob Paul

    Busch Campus

  • Chiron patio mosaic, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Busch Campus
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Chiron (1983), John Goodyear

    Walk across the outdoor plaza in front of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School building and you’ll notice some dark square pavers among the light ones. The pavers are arranged in an image of Chiron, a centaur in Greek mythology renowned as “the wounded healer” and teacher skilled in archery and medical arts. The image becomes visible when viewed from above.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Busch Campus

  • Neither Whales nor Turtles
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Neither Whales nor Turtles (1990), Jene Highstein

    Neither Whales nor Turtles plays with the viewer’s concept of volume and space. The sculpture is located in the courtyard adjacent to the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Busch Campus

  • RevolUtionary Monument, Busch Campus
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    RevolUtionary Monument (2015)

    A gift from Johnson & Johnson to longtime neighbor Rutgers University in honor of 250th anniversary of the institution's founding, the installation, found by the Visitor Center, comprises the word revolutionary in large white steel letters, with the first R and the U painted scarlet and capitalized. The piece refers to the university tagline "Revolutionary for 250 years."

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Busch Campus

  • The First Football Game Monument
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    The First Football Game Monument (1997) by Thomas Jay Warren

    A talisman touched by players before a game, The First Football Game Monument stands outside of HighPoint.com Stadium, a reminder that Rutgers is the birthplace of college football and the winner of the first college football game.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Busch Campus

  • Untitled
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Untitled (1993), Mary Miss

    This prominent installation outside the entrance of Alexander Library is an untitled work by artist Mary Miss. This composition of various components—a set of stairs, chain-link fencing—is a nod to the history of New Brunswick that invites students into an area for contemplation.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • Untitled (1974)
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Untitled (1974), George Kuehn

    This concrete and steel abstract constructivist sculpture is the creation of George Kuehn, who is known for works “stacked and wedged together” that “set up an internal system of forces.” Situated outside Alexander Library, the work was donated to Rutgers by Gloria Erlich in 2011.

    Photo: Lawrence Porter

    College Avenue Campus

  • William the Silent
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    William the Silent (1928), Toon Dupuis

    Radiating authority over Voorhees Mall, William the Silent, an iconic sculpture on the College Avenue Campus, celebrates this hero of the Netherlands and Rutgers’ Dutch colonial roots.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • Mason Gross Memorial
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Mason Gross Memorial (1994), Thomas Jay Warren

    A tribute to one of Rutgers’ most beloved presidents, who served from 1959 to 1971, the Mason Gross Memorial offers students a tranquil place to gather outside of Milledoler Hall.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • In Side Out
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    In Side Out (1982), Buky Schwartz

    Recently moved to a more central location on Voorhees Mall, In Side Out has been incorporated into the Class of 1942 World War II Memorial. Philip and Muriel Berman donated the work to Rutgers.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • Vietnam War Memorial
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Vietnam War Memorial (1993), R. Allan Christianson

    Remembering 15 Rutgers alumni who died in the Vietnam War or are missing in action, the Vietnam War Memorial stands proudly outside of Scott Hall.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • Walking Man, Zimmerli Art Museum
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Walking Man (1988), George Segal

    First casted in 1988 by Rutgers graduate George Segal, this bronze sculpture can be found outsite the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum. Walking Man is positioned in midstride, a pause that suggests reflection, indecision, or even regret in the midst of forward motion.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • The Tuning Fork Oracle
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    The Tuning Fork Oracle (1997), Alice Aycock

    Tipsy and futuristic, The Tuning Fork Oracle complements the artistic atmosphere of the Civic Square Building on Livingston Avenue in downtown New Brunswick.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • Inside Hippocrates, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Inside Hippocrates (1994), George Greenamyer

    Installed in 1994 in front of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Clinical Academic Building, Inside Hippocrates features two-foot-tall figures arranged across a 35-foot I-beam represent clinical academic medicine engaged in an interactive narrative. At each end is smaller replica of the Hippocrates statue found on the Busch Campus.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • Prayer Feather, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Prayer Feather (2002), Edward M. Adams

    At the entrance to the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Clinical Academic Building, this bronze sculpture is dedicated to the fallen victims of HIV/AIDS and to those who continue to fight the disease. Artist Edward Adams chose the feather form to refer back to Native American beliefs, where a feather is said to hold living energy and connect us with forces greater than ourselves.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • Free Fall sculpture, Cancer Institute of New Jersey
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Free Fall (2003), Elyn Zimmerman

    A granite sculpture that includes a waterfall and garden, Free Fall was conceived by artist Elyn Zimmerman as a "nature-scape"patients at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey could view from the waiting room.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    College Avenue Campus

  • Chair for Looking at Manhattan Island
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Chair for Looking at Manhattan Island (1983), Michel Gerard

    Situated under the branches of a mature Kwanzan cherry tree and a horse chestnut tree, the towering Chair for Looking at Manhattan Island commands Antilles Field, facing toward New York City.

    Photo: Zainab Miller

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • Sundial
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Sundial (1927), Paul Rudin

    The oldest sculpture at Rutgers, the charming Sundial by Paul Rudin, has stood behind College Hall since 1927.

    Photo: Zainab Miller

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • Brick Dome
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Brick Dome (1973), (Vera) Jackie Winsor

    Artist Jackie Winsor, a Mason Gross Class of 1967 alumna who is famous for her geometric sculpture, created the Brick Dome that now rests outside of Mabel Smith Douglass Library.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • Players
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Players (1981), Steven Feren

    Originally part of his M.F.A. thesis, artist Steven Feren conceived Players as a composition of two-dimensional pieces interacting with each other to form a three-dimensional whole. The sculpture stands in a small field outside the Art History Building.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • The Miraculating Machine in the Garden
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    The Miraculating Machine in the Garden (1982), Alice Aycock

    The whimsical and complex device integrated into an environment of trees and greenery is Alice Aycock’s The Miraculating Machine in the Garden. The work can be found on the north side of Mabel Smith Douglass Library.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • The Four Arts
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    The Four Arts (2002), John Goodyear

    The Four Arts in Bettenbender Plaza acknowledges each of the four disciplines that comprise the Mason Gross School of the Arts: dance, music, theater arts, and visual arts.

    Photo: Zainab Miller

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • Spiral Field
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Spiral Field (1993), Charles Fahlen

    Spiral Field by artist Charles Fahlen is a framework for viewing the landscaping in the Foran Stewardship Courtyard.

    Photo: Zainab Miller

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • Current
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Current (1994), Clyde Lynds

    Artist Clyde Lynds used fiber optic technology to illuminate the marine organisms in his sculpture Current. Located in front of the Marine Sciences Building, this sculpture comes to life at night.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • Rising
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Rising (2000), Scott Ernst

    The Rising patio mosaic by artist and Rutgers alumnus Scott Ernst welcomes visitors to the Cook Student Center.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    G.H. Cook/Douglass

  • Education Is an Open Book
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Education Is an Open Book (1987), Melvin Edwards

    Displayed outside of the James Dickson Carr Library, the towering Education Is an Open Book reminds students of the opportunities available through education.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Livingston Campus

  • Don Quixote with a Flower (1976) by Nikolai Silis
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Don Quixote with a Flower (1976), Nikolai Silis

    Donated by Mr. and Mrs. Igor Gomberg and installed in 2012, Don Quixote with a Flower is the creation of Russian sculptor Nikolai Silis. In this abstract copper work, Don Quixote sits in a relaxed position as he examines a flower.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Livingston Campus

  • Calligraph KC III
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Calligraph KC III (1968), Herbert Ferber

    Recently moved from its original home outside of Brower Commons, Calligraph KC III, an abstract copper “K” and “C” configuration, now stands proudly in the fountain area outside of Lucy Stone Hall.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Livingston Campus

  • Zhu’s Helper (2012) by Gary Kuehn
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Zhu’s Helper (2012), Gary Kuehn

    This sculpture by artist and Rutgers professor Gary Kuehn was built by four undergraduate visual arts students in the Mason Gross School of the Arts. The work is a nod to Zhu Rong, a Chinese mythological god who is said to be responsible for separating the sky and earth.

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Livingston Campus

  • Finding a Way in This World
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Finding a Way in This World (2002), Roger Borg

    A steel casting of a beech tree limb felled in a storm, this work was created by Rutgers’ Mason Gross School of the Arts alumnus Roger Borg to be “a visualization of the many interactions, events, circumstances, and choices made in life.”

    Photo: Zainab Miller

    Livingston Campus

  • Untitled
    Public Sculpture at Rutgers–New Brunswick
    Untitled (1973), “People’s Painters”

    Painted by “People’s Painters”—a largely student-run group established under the guidance of professor James Cockcroft and his wife, Eva Cockcroft, a noted muralist—this mural celebrates the idea of “Strength through Diversity.”

    Photo: Nick Romanenko

    Livingston Campus

  • Chichen Itza Blue
    1/40
  • Reflections
    2/40
  • Split and Twisted
    3/40
  • Signal
    4/40
  • Life Forms
    5/40
  • Untitled and Untitled
    6/40
  • Quaternion I and II
    7/40
  • Synergy
    8/40
  • Hippocrates Sculpture, Busch Campus
    9/40
  • Barcelona bell, Busch Campus
    10/40
  • Chiron patio mosaic, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Busch Campus
    11/40
  • Neither Whales nor Turtles
    12/40
  • RevolUtionary Monument, Busch Campus
    13/40
  • The First Football Game Monument
    14/40
  • Untitled
    15/40
  • Untitled (1974)
    16/40
  • William the Silent
    17/40
  • Mason Gross Memorial
    18/40
  • In Side Out
    19/40
  • Vietnam War Memorial
    20/40
  • Walking Man, Zimmerli Art Museum
    21/40
  • The Tuning Fork Oracle
    22/40
  • Inside Hippocrates, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
    23/40
  • Prayer Feather, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
    24/40
  • Free Fall sculpture, Cancer Institute of New Jersey
    25/40
  • Chair for Looking at Manhattan Island
    26/40
  • Sundial
    27/40
  • Brick Dome
    28/40
  • Players
    29/40
  • The Miraculating Machine in the Garden
    30/40
  • The Four Arts
    31/40
  • Spiral Field
    32/40
  • Current
    33/40
  • Rising
    34/40
  • Education Is an Open Book
    35/40
  • Don Quixote with a Flower (1976) by Nikolai Silis
    36/40
  • Calligraph KC III
    37/40
  • Zhu’s Helper (2012) by Gary Kuehn
    38/40
  • Finding a Way in This World
    39/40
  • Untitled
    40/40
  • Livingston campus map
    Livingston Campus
    A Compact Core within a Great Expanse

    Fields, forests, a compact walkable campus, and a stunning new building for business students help define Rutgers–New Brunswick’s largest campus. View a detailed map of the Livingston Campus.

  • Livingston College, 1969
    Livingston Campus
    A Campus Emerges

    In 1964, Rutgers acquired from the federal government 540 acres of the former Camp Kilmer army base and the first buildings were erected on the Kilmer-area campus, where Livingston College opened in 1969.

  • Rutgers Business School
    Livingston Campus
    Rutgers Business School

    Rutgers Business School building, at 100 Rockafeller Road, stands as a landmark gateway to the Livingston Campus. Two solar fields on campus supply power to the facility, which uses the latest technology in classrooms and student work centers. A large geothermal system heats and cools the building. 

  • Livingston Campus Solar Parking Canopy
    Livingston Campus
    Solar Energy

    Rutgers’ 1.4 megawatt solar farm and 8 megawatt solar parking canopy on the Livingston Campus combine to supply 60 percent of the power on the campus and help reduce the university’s carbon dioxide emissions.

  • A student on her laptop at the Kilmer Library
    Livingston Campus
    James Dickson Carr Library

    The James Dickson Carr Library houses a focused collection to support undergraduate education. The primary business library at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, it also houses career resource materials.

  • Livingston Student Center exterior
    Livingston Campus
    Livingston Student Center

    An expanded and revamped student center provides state-of-the-art conference rooms for group projects, performance venues, and lounges for a relaxing cup of coffee and a sandwich.

  • Livingston Dining Commons
    Livingston Campus
    Good Food

    The 58,000-square-foot, $30.5 million, 900-seat Livingston Dining Commons offers multiple enticing food stations, including cook-to-order, sushi, Mongolian stir fry, pasta, fresh pizza, deli items, dessert, and a salad bar.

  • Livingston campus dorms
    Livingston Campus
    New Housing

    New student apartments provide the same close-knit feel of the three dormitory complexes known affectionately—and oddly—as the Quads.

  • Rutgers Cinema
    Livingston Campus
    Rutgers Cinema

    At the student apartments, ground-floor shops and eateries line the Plaza at Livingston. Catch a first-run movie at Rutgers Cinema, then grab a bite and do some shopping. It's open to the public and parking is free in Livingston's Yellow and Green Lots on weekends.

  • A basketball game at the Louis Brown Athletic Center
    Livingston Campus
    The Louis Brown Athletic Center

    The RAC. It’s where the men’s and women’s basketball teams practice and play home games. Exuberant fans and a raucous pep band contribute to a home team advantage.

  • Livingston campus map
    1/10
  • Livingston College, 1969
    2/10
  • Rutgers Business School
    3/10
  • Livingston Campus Solar Parking Canopy
    4/10
  • A student on her laptop at the Kilmer Library
    5/10
  • Livingston Student Center exterior
    6/10
  • Livingston Dining Commons
    7/10
  • Livingston campus dorms
    8/10
  • Rutgers Cinema
    9/10
  • A basketball game at the Louis Brown Athletic Center
    10/10
  • George H. Cook campus map
    George H. Cook Campus
    Green and More

    G.H. Cook Campus is where we engage the stuff of life: what happens under the sea, the flora and fauna of the earth, how we interact with our environment, what we eat, and how the atmosphere and farthest reaches of the heavens affect our lives. View a detailed map of the Cook Campus.

  • George H. Cook
    George H. Cook Campus
    New Jersey's Land-Grant College

    Thanks to the tenacious lobbying of George H. Cook, in 1864 the state legislature picked the Rutgers Scientific School over Princeton University to be the state land-grant college, paving the way for Rutgers to become The State University of New Jersey.

  • Exterior of Cook Student Center
    George H. Cook Campus
    Cook Student Center

    Campus life is hopping at the G.H. Cook Student Center. Events are happening every day, there's tasty food to eat, and there are plenty of locations for quiet studying or hanging out. From the computer lab to the game room, you'll enjoy time spent here.

  • A student conducting turfgrass research
    George H. Cook Campus
    The Flora

    Yes, we're interested in agriculture, but our greenhouses go far beyond the farm. Our turfgrass researchers scour the globe for resilient eco-friendly grasses that use fewer pesticides and less water. Other scientists discover plants that eat and neutralize toxins found in contaminated soils.

  • Students studying sheep
    George H. Cook Campus
    The Fauna

    Sheep, pigs, cows, insects, cytoplasm, mitochondria: if it's living, it's the subject of study at the G.H. Cook Campus. The most obvious fauna encountered on campus are our domesticated farm animals.

  • A horse walking on a treadmill
    George H. Cook Campus
    The Science of Caring for Horses

    New Jersey’s equine industry (that’s horse racing, riding, competing, and more) looks to Rutgers’ Equine Science Center for education and science to promote the good health of our fleet, four-footed friends. The center is one of 10 hosted by the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.

  • Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratory
    George H. Cook Campus
    It's COOL under the Sea

    The Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences' Coastal Ocean Observing Leadership is one of the hottest spots on campus. Scientists in this lab are true undersea trailblazers, responsible for the first undersea trans-Atlantic robotic glider crossing.

  • Students at Passion Puddle
    George H. Cook Campus
    Passion Puddle

    Whether your passion is frisbee, picnicking, quietly strolling, or l’amour, Passion Puddle is a favorite place to relax and change the pace of a hectic collegiate life. It was formed by damming natural springs that are the headwaters of a small creek.

  • Exterior of the Institute of Food, Nutrition, and Health
    George H. Cook Campus
    The “Healthy State”

    The centerpiece of the campus, the New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition, and Health oversees multiple centers of excellence and several programs whose mission is to make New Jersey the “healthy state” and a model for the nation.

  • Rutgers Gardens
    George H. Cook Campus
    Rutgers Gardens

    A glorious resource on the outskirts of the G.H. Cook Campus, the Rutgers Gardens are a true Jersey gem. Acres and acres of specialized collections feature everything from a rhododendron and azalea display garden to an ornamental tree collection to a bamboo forest.

  • Rutgers Entomological Museum
    George H. Cook Campus
    Get Buggy

    The Rutgers Entomological Museum maintains a collection of over 200,000 pinned specimens.

  • George H. Cook campus map
    1/11
  • George H. Cook
    2/11
  • Exterior of Cook Student Center
    3/11
  • A student conducting turfgrass research
    4/11
  • Students studying sheep
    5/11
  • A horse walking on a treadmill
    6/11
  • Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratory
    7/11
  • Students at Passion Puddle
    8/11
  • Exterior of the Institute of Food, Nutrition, and Health
    9/11
  • Rutgers Gardens
    10/11
  • Rutgers Entomological Museum
    11/11
  • Students in front of the State Theater
    Playhouses and Movies
    The State Theatre

    Located in downtown New Brunswick, The State Theatre is a premier venue for a diverse mix of concerts and theater offerings, such as Melissa Etheridge, Cheap Trick, the American Repertory Ballet’s The Nutcracker, and the off-Broadway sensation STOMP.

  • George Street Playhouse exterior
    Playhouses and Movies
    George Street Playhouse

    Located in downtown New Brunswick, George Street Playhouse hosts critically acclaimed plays and musicals, such as Jack Klugman and Paul Dooley in Neil Simon’s The Sunshine Boys and William Finn’s landmark musical Falsettos, in addition to new original productions.

  • Crossroads Theater Company exterior
    Playhouses and Movies
    Crossroads Theater Company

    A Tony-award winning playhouse, Crossroads Theater Company celebrates the African-American experience, with noteworthy productions such Jitney by August Wilson and Flyin’ West written by Pearl Cleage. Photo courtesy of Crossroads Theatre Building.

  • Dancers in front of the NIcolas Music Center
    Playhouses and Movies
    Mason Gross School of the Arts

    With performances at Rutgers University’s Nicholas Music Center on the Douglass Campus, Mason Gross Presents is a year-round performing arts series featuring performances in theater, music, and dance, as well as visual arts exhibitions.

  • Circle Players perform
    Playhouses and Movies
    Circle Players

    As a small Piscataway-based community playhouse, the Circle Players offers a broad array of performances in the round such as Othello, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and The Fantasticks.

  • AMC Lowes Theater exterior
    Playhouses and Movies
    AMC Lowes New Brunswick 18

    Located at 17 Route 1, just North of Rutgers-New Brunswick, AMC Lowes New Brunswick 18 offers 18 screens of mind-stimulating comedy, drama, action, adventure, animation, and horror movies, including an IMAX screen and three 3-D screens.

  • Regal Theater exterior
    Playhouses and Movies
    Regal Hadley Theatre 16

    Located at 1000 Corporate Court in South Plainfield, about 2.5 miles from the Busch and Livingston campuses, the theater offers 16 movie viewing screens.

  • Students in front of the State Theater
    1/7
  • George Street Playhouse exterior
    2/7
  • Crossroads Theater Company exterior
    3/7
  • Dancers in front of the NIcolas Music Center
    4/7
  • Circle Players perform
    5/7
  • AMC Lowes Theater exterior
    6/7
  • Regal Theater exterior
    7/7

Pages